Scooter the around skateboard

Cant choose between a bike, scooter or a skateboard for the commute to work? Now you dont have to, as inventors have come up with a contraption that combines all three into one.The device, called a Sbyke, offers riders young and old the ability to enjoy the three modes of transport simulataneously in a bizarre contraption that has cherry-picked features from each.It has a set of handlebars and a big front wheel like a bike, but the back section looks more like a skateboard. The rider propels themselves as if they were on a scooter.Scroll down for video 
Two Californian inventors have come up with a new type of transport. The Sbyke (shown) is a mix of a bike, scooter and a skateboard. It has handlebars and a big front wheel, but the back has a flat sectionIts makers say riding a Sbyke feels nothing like a conventional scooter – instead it is more like skiing on a pavement.
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FORD UNVEILS 21ST CENTURY BIKE  Ford may be known for its cars, but at this year’s Mobile World Congress the auto giant also unveiled a pair of electric bikes.Both prototypes are powered by 200-watt motors, fold to fit on a train or in the boot of a car, and with pedal assist, help riders reach speeds of up to 15mph (25km/h).The bikes are part of an experiment by Ford called Handle on Mobility, which aims to make journeys safer and more efficient.The bikes, called MoDe:Me and MoDe:Pro, are based on designs by Ford employees and take inspiration from technology seen in cars.For example, both bikes are fitted with rear-facing ultrasonic sensors.These sensors link with the handlebars to discreetly alert the rider when a car is about to overtake using subtle vibrations.  The Sbyke is the brainchild of racing drivers Bart and Steve Wilson from San Clemente California who came up with the design as a way to get around the pit lanes at a race track quickly.The Wilson brothers then teamed up with designer Brad Wernli and together they built the first prototype in Brads garage before launching the product worldwide.The Sbyke comes in two main models – a mini one for children under seven and a bigger version for older kids and adults.The smaller one costs £99.95 ($149) and the bigger is £159.95 ($249) from sbykeuk.co.uk.Shaun Turner from Hertfordshire, director of Sbyke UK, said: The Sbyke is the evolution of the kick scooter – a brand new revolutionary hybrid scooter which takes the best elements from scootering, skateboarding and cycling and rolls them all into one.Although it looks a little like a bike, a skateboard and a scooter all mixed together, it rides unlike any of them.Sbyke takes the best attributes of each and combines them into something totally unique.Imagine skiing and surfing but on the pavement. Thats the sensation Sbyke can give you.Sbyke – Coasts Like a Bike, Carves Like a Skateboard

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Scotland newcomer Matt Ritchie has revealed he thought he was the victim of a prank when Gordon Strachan first rang him about a call-up.The Bournemouth winger was the surprise name in the 26-man pool announced on Monday for the forthcoming friendly against Northern Ireland and Euro 2016 qualifier against Gibraltar.Ritchie was born in the Hampshire town of Gosport but qualifies for Scotland through his father Alex.
Matt Ritchie, pictured celebrating against Derby County last month, has been named in the Scotland squad 
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Function (tdcs) treatment new

Daydreaming can be good for you and actually boost the brain, researchers have found.They say that while we daydream, the brain is actually more effective. They believe that when we daydream, it is freed up to process tasks more effectively.
The team found daydreaming offers a positive, effect on task performance. HOW TO TRIGGER A DAYDREAM Participants were treated with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive and painless procedure that uses low-level electricity to stimulate specific brain regions. The key to mind wandering was when this stimulation was applied to the frontal lobes, the team said. According to the new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a wandering mind can impart a distinct cognitive advantage.Scientists at Bar-Ilan University were able to show an external stimulus of low-level electricity can literally change the way we think, producing a measurable up-tick in the rate at which daydreams – or spontaneous, self-directed thoughts and associations – occur.The team found this state offers a positive, simultaneous effect on task performance.Over the last 15 or 20 years, scientists have shown that – unlike the localized neural activity associated with specific tasks – mind wandering involves the activation of a gigantic default network involving many parts of the brain, Prof. Moshe Bar, part of the Universitys Gonda (Goldschmied) Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center said. 
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This cross-brain involvement may be involved in behavioral outcomes such as creativity and mood, and may also contribute to the ability to stay successfully on-task while the mind goes off on its merry mental way.Bar believes that this surprising result might stem from the convergence, within a single brain region, of both the thought controlling mechanisms of executive function and the thought freeing activity of spontaneous, self-directed daydreams.While it is commonly assumed that people have a finite cognitive capacity for paying attention, Bar said that the present study suggests that the truth may be more complicated.Interestingly, while our studys external stimulation increased the incidence of mind wandering, rather than reducing the subjects ability to complete the task, it caused task performance to become slightly improved. The external stimulation actually enhanced the subjects cognitive capacity.Participants were treated with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive and painless procedure that uses low-level electricity to stimulate specific brain regions.
The key to mind wandering was when this stimulation was applied to the frontal lobes, the team said.During treatment, the participants were asked to track and respond to numerals flashed on a computer screen. They were also periodically asked to respond to an on-screen thought probe in which they reported – on a scale of one to four – the extent to which they were experiencing spontaneous thoughts unrelated to the numeric task they had been given. As a point of comparison and in separate experiments, the researchers used tDCS to stimulate the occipital cortex – the visual processing center in the back of the brain. They also conducted control studies where no tDCS was used.While the self-reported incidence of mind wandering was unchanged in the case of occipital and sham stimulation, it rose considerably when this stimulation was applied to the frontal lobes. Our results go beyond what was achieved in earlier, fMRI-based studies, Bar states. They demonstrate that the frontal lobes play a causal role in the production of mind wandering behavior.